Munk School Fellowship in Global Journalism

At the University of Toronto. Teaching scholars and professionals how to cover their disciplines as journalists for media around the world.

Globe and Mail — The medical process after a tumour diagnosis

BY SHAFIQ QAADRI (FGJ ‘15) After “unbearable” pain forced Toronto’s mayor into hospital Wednesday, Rob Ford learned he has a tumour in his abdomen. He is awaiting results of tests to determine if that tumour is benign. Although Ford has been given a “working diagnosis,” medical authorities and Ford’s family have not commented and are not speculating on what the outcome might be. Read more

Meet a doctor who uses a digital health tracker, and thinks you should too
BY SHAFIQ QAADRI (FGJ ‘15) Okay, I’m sold. Doctors should start recommending wearable computing, the digital devices that count steps, calories burned and even how restfully you sleep. Used properly, these gadgets can be life-altering. Read more

Meet a doctor who uses a digital health tracker, and thinks you should too

BY SHAFIQ QAADRI (FGJ ‘15) Okay, I’m sold. Doctors should start recommending wearable computing, the digital devices that count steps, calories burned and even how restfully you sleep. Used properly, these gadgets can be life-altering. Read more

CNN — Surgical ‘black box’ could reduce errors
BY CHETHAN SATHYA (FGJ ‘14) Inside the operating room, video cameras track every movement. Outside, a small computer-like device analyzes the recordings, identifying when mistakes are made and providing instant feedback to surgeons as they operate. Read more

CNN — Surgical ‘black box’ could reduce errors

BY CHETHAN SATHYA (FGJ ‘14) Inside the operating room, video cameras track every movement. Outside, a small computer-like device analyzes the recordings, identifying when mistakes are made and providing instant feedback to surgeons as they operate. Read more

Dallas Morning News — Galveston lab works to stop Ebola virus in its tracks
BY SEEMA YASMIN (FGJ ‘14) In a laboratory on Galveston Island, Tom Geisbert is working overtime. The pressure is on as the biggest Ebola epidemic in history creeps across West Africa, jumping over borders and permeating cells. The virus has killed more than 1,000 people. For Geisbert, three decades of scientific grunt work — hours of pipetting and disinfecting and note-taking and grant-writing — are thrust into the limelight. The public demands a cure. Read more

Dallas Morning News — Galveston lab works to stop Ebola virus in its tracks

BY SEEMA YASMIN (FGJ ‘14) In a laboratory on Galveston Island, Tom Geisbert is working overtime. The pressure is on as the biggest Ebola epidemic in history creeps across West Africa, jumping over borders and permeating cells. The virus has killed more than 1,000 people. For Geisbert, three decades of scientific grunt work — hours of pipetting and disinfecting and note-taking and grant-writing — are thrust into the limelight. The public demands a cure. Read more

Dallas Morning News — Galveston lab develops promising vaccine for Ebola
BY SEEMA YASMIN (FGJ ‘14) The biggest, longest and most complex Ebola epidemic in history is spreading across West Africa. The death toll has passed the 1,000 mark and the pressure is on to find a cure. Read more

Dallas Morning News — Galveston lab develops promising vaccine for Ebola

BY SEEMA YASMIN (FGJ ‘14) The biggest, longest and most complex Ebola epidemic in history is spreading across West Africa. The death toll has passed the 1,000 mark and the pressure is on to find a cure. Read more

Deseret News — Global group helps deaf Muslims embrace their faith
BY SHELINA JAFFER (FGJ ‘14) For years Nashiru Abdulai sat on the sidelines of his faith. Unlike his non-Muslim classmates at a school for the deaf, his local mosque didn’t offer interpretation services or other accommodations to help him participate in Islamic worship. Read more

Deseret News — Global group helps deaf Muslims embrace their faith

BY SHELINA JAFFER (FGJ ‘14) For years Nashiru Abdulai sat on the sidelines of his faith. Unlike his non-Muslim classmates at a school for the deaf, his local mosque didn’t offer interpretation services or other accommodations to help him participate in Islamic worship. Read more

Dallas Morning News — Fort Worth doctor infected with Ebola offers serum to sick colleague

BY SEEMA YASMIN (FGJ ‘14) AND CHARLES SCUDDER Even as Dr. Kent Brantly’s condition worsened Thursday, the Fort Worth doctor diagnosed with Ebola in Liberia was trying to save the lives of others. An experimental serum arrived in the country, but only enough for one person. Brantly insisted that it go to his colleague Nancy Writebol, who is also fighting the disease. Read more

Dallas Morning News — Stopping disease outbreak
Dr. Seema Yasmin (FGJ ‘14), a former disease detective, discusses the steps of stopping an outbreak. Watch the clip here

Dallas Morning News — Stopping disease outbreak

Dr. Seema Yasmin (FGJ ‘14), a former disease detective, discusses the steps of stopping an outbreak. Watch the clip here

CNN — Doctor Mourns Mentor Lost on Flight 17
Seema Yasmin (FGJ ‘14) was interviewed on CNN about her late colleagues, Joep Lange and Jacqueline van Tongeren. Watch the clip here

CNN — Doctor Mourns Mentor Lost on Flight 17

Seema Yasmin (FGJ ‘14) was interviewed on CNN about her late colleagues, Joep Lange and Jacqueline van Tongeren. Watch the clip here

Vice — Canada’s Foreign Aid Strategy Should Prioritize Condoms
BY ALIA DHARSSI (FGJ ‘14) Canada has been doing some pretty incredible shit when it comes to women’s rights internationally. Just this past week, Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird traveled to London to speak up for girls at a global summit on ending child marriage. And back in May, Prime Minister Harper was praised by likes of the president of the World Bank and the United Nations Secretary General when he hosted a summit for ending the preventable deaths of poor mothers and their babies in developing countries. Read more

Vice — Canada’s Foreign Aid Strategy Should Prioritize Condoms

BY ALIA DHARSSI (FGJ ‘14) Canada has been doing some pretty incredible shit when it comes to women’s rights internationally. Just this past week, Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird traveled to London to speak up for girls at a global summit on ending child marriage. And back in May, Prime Minister Harper was praised by likes of the president of the World Bank and the United Nations Secretary General when he hosted a summit for ending the preventable deaths of poor mothers and their babies in developing countries. Read more

NBC5 — Dr. Seema Yasmin on why doctors chase outbreaks of diseases like Ebola
Dr. Seema Yasmin (FGJ ‘14) , Dallas Morning News staff writer, once worked as a disease detective at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She talks to NBC5 about why doctors are so willing to put themselves at risk during such outbreaks. Watch the clip here

NBC5 — Dr. Seema Yasmin on why doctors chase outbreaks of diseases like Ebola

Dr. Seema Yasmin (FGJ ‘14) , Dallas Morning News staff writer, once worked as a disease detective at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She talks to NBC5 about why doctors are so willing to put themselves at risk during such outbreaks. Watch the clip here

Dallas Morning News — Fort Worth doctor tests positive for Ebola while working for aid group in Liberia
BY SEEMA YASMIN (FGJ ‘14) and JULIE FANCHER A Fort Worth doctor working in Liberia with Ebola patients through an international relief agency has tested positive for the virus, the agency announced in a news release Saturday. Read more

Dallas Morning News — Fort Worth doctor tests positive for Ebola while working for aid group in Liberia

BY SEEMA YASMIN (FGJ ‘14) and JULIE FANCHER A Fort Worth doctor working in Liberia with Ebola patients through an international relief agency has tested positive for the virus, the agency announced in a news release Saturday. Read more

Dallas Morning News — Ebola virus hits closer to home
BY SEEMA YASMIN (FGJ ‘14) For most of us in the United States, the Ebola virus that is ravaging West Africa seems far away. Since March 21, Ebola has killed 632 people in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, according to the World Health Organization, making it the largest outbreak ever of the deadly virus. Read more

Dallas Morning News — Ebola virus hits closer to home

BY SEEMA YASMIN (FGJ ‘14) For most of us in the United States, the Ebola virus that is ravaging West Africa seems far away. Since March 21, Ebola has killed 632 people in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, according to the World Health Organization, making it the largest outbreak ever of the deadly virus. Read more

Vice — Canada Is Far from Breaking the Glass Ceiling Over Women in the Workplace
BY ALIA DHARSSI (FGJ ‘14) Canada has historically been recognized as a leader in women’s rights, but a report published by Oxfam last week suggests that progress in women’s participation in the Canadian economy has ground to a halt over the last two decades. Read more

Vice — Canada Is Far from Breaking the Glass Ceiling Over Women in the Workplace

BY ALIA DHARSSI (FGJ ‘14) Canada has historically been recognized as a leader in women’s rights, but a report published by Oxfam last week suggests that progress in women’s participation in the Canadian economy has ground to a halt over the last two decades. Read more

Open Canada — Using the Internet to Save Lives in Iran
Canadian human rights activist Maryam Nayeb Yazdi saves lives in Iran from her desk in Toronto, where she is at the centre of an international network of activists that work to improve human rights and stop executions in Iran. Though born in Iran, she spent most of her childhood in Canada. She first became concerned about the human rights situation in Iran in 2007 when she saw an interview on Persian satellite TV with a young human rights activist who had escaped Iran after being jailed, tortured and placed in solitary confinement by the Iranian authorities. In 2009, after the Iranian government violently suppressed protests in the aftermath of the Iranian presidential election, she founded Persian2English, a blog that documents human rights violations in Iran for an international audience. Today, she works to draw attention to a range of human rights issues in Iran, including executions, which, she says, take place in public squares each year to instill fear among the population. OpenCanada reporter Alia Dharssi (FGJ ‘14) sat down with Yazdi – who awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal by the Governor General in 2013 – to talk about her efforts to halt executions and about how she makes human rights issues go viral. Read more

Open Canada — Using the Internet to Save Lives in Iran

Canadian human rights activist Maryam Nayeb Yazdi saves lives in Iran from her desk in Toronto, where she is at the centre of an international network of activists that work to improve human rights and stop executions in Iran. Though born in Iran, she spent most of her childhood in Canada. She first became concerned about the human rights situation in Iran in 2007 when she saw an interview on Persian satellite TV with a young human rights activist who had escaped Iran after being jailed, tortured and placed in solitary confinement by the Iranian authorities. In 2009, after the Iranian government violently suppressed protests in the aftermath of the Iranian presidential election, she founded Persian2English, a blog that documents human rights violations in Iran for an international audience. Today, she works to draw attention to a range of human rights issues in Iran, including executions, which, she says, take place in public squares each year to instill fear among the population. OpenCanada reporter Alia Dharssi (FGJ ‘14) sat down with Yazdi – who awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal by the Governor General in 2013 – to talk about her efforts to halt executions and about how she makes human rights issues go viral. Read more