Munk School Fellowship in Global Journalism

At the University of Toronto. Teaching scholars and professionals how to cover their disciplines as journalists for media around the world.

Healthy Debate — Paying for plasma – Canada’s double standard?
BY MEERA DALAL (FGJ ‘14) Sandra Duvlock was 58 when she was diagnosed with dermatomyositis. The gradual inflammation of her muscles had gotten to the point where she was unable to walk, clean or feed herself. When this relatively rare disease was diagnosed, Duvlock was prescribed intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment and long-term physical rehabilitation. Read more

Healthy Debate — Paying for plasma – Canada’s double standard?

BY MEERA DALAL (FGJ ‘14) Sandra Duvlock was 58 when she was diagnosed with dermatomyositis. The gradual inflammation of her muscles had gotten to the point where she was unable to walk, clean or feed herself. When this relatively rare disease was diagnosed, Duvlock was prescribed intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment and long-term physical rehabilitation. Read more

Thomson Reuters Foundation — Euro zone’s trade surplus widens on rising exports in February

BY ANNA NICOLAOU (FGJ ‘14) The euro zone’s trade surplus widened in February from a year earlier on rising exports with imports unchanged, the European Union’s statistics office Eurostat said on Tuesday. Read more

CBC News — Adding small businesses to Toronto’s high-rise residential towers
BY MICHELLE ADELMAN (FGJ ‘14) The large chest freezer in Shazia Iqbal’s small apartment kitchen on Toronto’s Thorncliffe Park Drive is stuffed with kebabs and other Middle Eastern delicacies. Iqbal loves to cook — and not just for her family of six. She also shares her food with friends and her children’s school community. But her big dream is to start her own catering business. Read more

CBC News — Adding small businesses to Toronto’s high-rise residential towers

BY MICHELLE ADELMAN (FGJ ‘14) The large chest freezer in Shazia Iqbal’s small apartment kitchen on Toronto’s Thorncliffe Park Drive is stuffed with kebabs and other Middle Eastern delicacies. Iqbal loves to cook — and not just for her family of six. She also shares her food with friends and her children’s school community. But her big dream is to start her own catering business. Read more

CBC Radio (Metro Morning) — Highrise Entrepreneurs

Small businesses are the heart and soul of many Toronto neighbourhoods. This morning, the City of Toronto is looking at zoning changes that could unleash some of that same entrepreneurial energy in Toronto’s high-rise communities. As the CBC’s Mary Wiens tells us, that entrepreneurial energy is already there, operating under the radar.

Michelle Adelman (FGJ ‘14) co-produced this segment for Metro Morning. Listen to the clip here.

Thomson Reuters Foundation — European parliament votes for compulsory ‘made-in’ labels
BY ANNA NICOLAOU (FGJ ‘14) The European Parliament voted on Tuesday to oblige manufacturers to label all non-food goods with their country of origin, a step designed to help consumers know what they are buying, but one that has divided industry. Read more

Thomson Reuters Foundation — European parliament votes for compulsory ‘made-in’ labels

BY ANNA NICOLAOU (FGJ ‘14) The European Parliament voted on Tuesday to oblige manufacturers to label all non-food goods with their country of origin, a step designed to help consumers know what they are buying, but one that has divided industry. Read more

Vice — Not Everyone Is Happy About Green Energy
BY ASHLEY RENDERS (FGJ ‘14) The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) finalized a report over the weekend that tells governments what can be done to avoid the dangerous and scary effects of climate change. Like a good psychic reading, the report intentionally does not provide a pathway to success, but shows us what the future could look like if governments tweaked different things, such as changing gas prices, adding green energy, subtracting nuclear power plants, etc. Read more

Vice — Not Everyone Is Happy About Green Energy

BY ASHLEY RENDERS (FGJ ‘14) The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) finalized a report over the weekend that tells governments what can be done to avoid the dangerous and scary effects of climate change. Like a good psychic reading, the report intentionally does not provide a pathway to success, but shows us what the future could look like if governments tweaked different things, such as changing gas prices, adding green energy, subtracting nuclear power plants, etc. Read more

CBC Radio (Tapestry) — Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

You will have heard the phrase: “It’s enough to make a grown man cry.” Ben and Anthony Holden are a father/son duo who did a kind of ‘survey’ of men-who-cry over poetry. The idea was to ask some very famous men whether there is a poem they cannot read without breaking down.

Shelina Jaffer (FGJ ‘14) co-produced this segment for Tapestry. Listen to the clip here.

CBC Radio (Tapestry) — Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

You will have heard the phrase: “It’s enough to make a grown man cry.” Ben and Anthony Holden are a father/son duo who did a kind of ‘survey’ of men-who-cry over poetry. The idea was to ask some very famous men whether there is a poem they cannot read without breaking down.

Shelina Jaffer (FGJ ‘14) co-produced this segment for Tapestry. Listen to the clip here.

National Post — Recruiters charging foreign workers in Ontario illegal fees as high as $12,000 for jobs that might not exist, report finds
BY RACHEL BROWNE (FGJ ‘14) The number of temporary foreign workers in Canada has more than tripled since 2000 to 338,213 in 2012 providing a boon for job recruiters, some of whom are exploiting foreign workers, a new report finds. Read more

National Post — Recruiters charging foreign workers in Ontario illegal fees as high as $12,000 for jobs that might not exist, report finds

BY RACHEL BROWNE (FGJ ‘14) The number of temporary foreign workers in Canada has more than tripled since 2000 to 338,213 in 2012 providing a boon for job recruiters, some of whom are exploiting foreign workers, a new report finds. Read more

CBC Radio (Q with Jian Ghomeshi) — Researchers risking death to document Syria’s crisis

The conflict in Syria is now entering its third year, still with no end in sight. For most Syrians any semblance of their former lives has vanished: entire neighbourhoods are being shelled and razed to the ground, cities are emptying out as residents flee, and the death toll continues its steady rise. The latest estimates put the number of dead at over 100,000. But it’s not just the people of Syria who are in jeopardy, the evidence of countless human rights violations is also at risk. Enter the Syrian Commission for Justice and Accountability. Journalist and attorney Jordan Fletcher (FGJ ‘14),a fellow at the University of Toronto’s Munk Centre for Global Affairs, recently co-authored a piece about the investigators out risking their lives to get incriminating documents out of Syria. He speaks to Jian about the individual risks of truth-seeking in Syria, as well as the historic dangers of allowing the proof to disappear.

Listen to the clip here.

CBC Radio (Q with Jian Ghomeshi) — Researchers risking death to document Syria’s crisis

The conflict in Syria is now entering its third year, still with no end in sight. For most Syrians any semblance of their former lives has vanished: entire neighbourhoods are being shelled and razed to the ground, cities are emptying out as residents flee, and the death toll continues its steady rise. The latest estimates put the number of dead at over 100,000.

But it’s not just the people of Syria who are in jeopardy, the evidence of countless human rights violations is also at risk. Enter the Syrian Commission for Justice and Accountability.

Journalist and attorney Jordan Fletcher (FGJ ‘14),a fellow at the University of Toronto’s Munk Centre for Global Affairs, recently co-authored a piece about the investigators out risking their lives to get incriminating documents out of Syria.

He speaks to Jian about the individual risks of truth-seeking in Syria, as well as the historic dangers of allowing the proof to disappear.

Listen to the clip here.

Thomson Reuters — OECD development aid hits record high in 2013, Europe lags

BY ANNA NICOLAOU (FGJ ‘14) Development aid from rich countries to some of the world’s poorest rose to a record high last year, data showed on Tuesday, but contributions from mainland Europe lagged as the region clawed its way out of recession. Read more

Vice — Meet the Investigators Who Risk Their Lives to Take Incriminating Documents Out of Syria
BY ALIA DHARSSI AND JORDAN FLETCHER (FGJ ‘14) The first time Ahmed was shot at by Syrian government forces he was outside Aleppo, driving in a car loaded with bags of incriminating documents. He could hear the gunfire aimed in his direction, the rounds passing close by in the dense night fog. Read more

Vice — Meet the Investigators Who Risk Their Lives to Take Incriminating Documents Out of Syria

BY ALIA DHARSSI AND JORDAN FLETCHER (FGJ ‘14) The first time Ahmed was shot at by Syrian government forces he was outside Aleppo, driving in a car loaded with bags of incriminating documents. He could hear the gunfire aimed in his direction, the rounds passing close by in the dense night fog. Read more

Open Canada — The Solutions to Climate Change are Solutions for the 99 Percent
BY ALIA DHARSSI (FGJ ‘14) Canadian climate activist Tzeporah Berman rose to prominence in the Canadian environmental movement just over two decades ago, when she helped organize one of the largest acts of civil disobedience in Canadian history. Concerned about the logging of the temperate rainforest in Clayquot Sound, British Columbia, which houses giant trees hundreds of years old, Berman worked with Greenpeace to organize logging blockades that drew international attention, led to the arrest of more than 800 people in 1993, and pushed the provincial government to change its policies. After spending years working to protect forests, she turned to climate change, eventually becoming the co-director of Greenpeace International’s Global Climate and Energy Program in 2010. In 2012, she left Greenpeace and returned to Canada so that she could focus on environmental issues at home, including the oil sands and the Northern Gateway pipeline. OpenCanada reporter Alia Dharssi sat down with her in Vancouver to discuss solutions to climate change. Read more

Open Canada — The Solutions to Climate Change are Solutions for the 99 Percent

BY ALIA DHARSSI (FGJ ‘14) Canadian climate activist Tzeporah Berman rose to prominence in the Canadian environmental movement just over two decades ago, when she helped organize one of the largest acts of civil disobedience in Canadian history. Concerned about the logging of the temperate rainforest in Clayquot Sound, British Columbia, which houses giant trees hundreds of years old, Berman worked with Greenpeace to organize logging blockades that drew international attention, led to the arrest of more than 800 people in 1993, and pushed the provincial government to change its policies. After spending years working to protect forests, she turned to climate change, eventually becoming the co-director of Greenpeace International’s Global Climate and Energy Program in 2010. In 2012, she left Greenpeace and returned to Canada so that she could focus on environmental issues at home, including the oil sands and the Northern Gateway pipeline. OpenCanada reporter Alia Dharssi sat down with her in Vancouver to discuss solutions to climate change. Read more

CBC Radio (The Current) — Plastic surgery below the belt? Doctors divided over labiaplasty

It is not the price reduction that concerns some doctors, it is what is being reduced. Labiaplasty is a cosmetic surgery to alter female genitals, and it’s in high demand. Some doctors are refusing. citing parallels to female genital cutting. Others say the demand is driven by pornography’s influence.

Meera Dalal (FGJ ‘14) co-produced this segment for The Current. Listen to the clip
CBC News — Labiaplasty defended by plastic surgeons 
BY MEERA DALAL (FGJ ‘14) Carrie Anne (not her real name) is a triathlete in her 40’s, biking for 8 to 10 hours at a time but limited by the discomfort caused by the length of her labia. Thinking it was normal, she lived with it for years until finally getting a labiaplasty,  a surgery that ‘trims’ the labia minora or inner labia, the external parts of the vagina. Read more

CBC News — Labiaplasty defended by plastic surgeons

BY MEERA DALAL (FGJ ‘14) Carrie Anne (not her real name) is a triathlete in her 40’s, biking for 8 to 10 hours at a time but limited by the discomfort caused by the length of her labia. Thinking it was normal, she lived with it for years until finally getting a labiaplasty,  a surgery that ‘trims’ the labia minora or inner labia, the external parts of the vagina. Read more

Toronto Star — The danger of cracking down on unpaid internships
BY MICHEAL KEMPA (FGJ ‘13) Politicians battling for the interests — and votes — of middle-class Canadians have unpaid internships in their sights. But cracking down could do more harm than good for both young people and business if we are not smart about it. Read more

Toronto Star — The danger of cracking down on unpaid internships

BY MICHEAL KEMPA (FGJ ‘13) Politicians battling for the interests — and votes — of middle-class Canadians have unpaid internships in their sights. But cracking down could do more harm than good for both young people and business if we are not smart about it. Read more